WSU CAHNRS

College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences

International Research & Agricultural Development

Paluthe Farm Project

Promoting Agricultural Learning & Understanding Through Human Experiences

The Paluthe Farm Project (PFP) operates at the intellectual nexus of academic research, agricultural extension, international development, and sustainable innovation. By utilizing experiential learning, applied research & design, conscientious community engagement, and culturally-driven local solutions, the PFP focuses on the inter-connectivity between agricultural sustainability, economic stability, and environmental stewardship in developing and emerging economies throughout the world.

According to the UN, approximately 2.5 billion people around the world are involved in full- or part-time smallholder agriculture. One billion of those farmers are solely reliant on agriculture for income, living in rural areas on less than $1.25 a day. Smallholders manage 80% of the world’s estimated 500 million small farms, which account for 80% of food consumed in developing countries. Demand on agriculture is growing due to the pressures of feeding large urbanized populations, and rural areas face higher levels of malnourishment and illness. Improving systems on smallholder farms (whether irrigation, storage, cropping, or market-based) has the potential to spark economic growth, improve food security, and reduce levels of poverty.

Supported by Washington State University’s International Research Development office and the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, the Paluthe Farm Project implements a set of farming practices which demonstrate sustainable agricultural intensification efforts currently being researched by WSU faculty. On-farm technologies include appropriate-scale mechanizations related to irrigation, sanitation, drinking water, alternative energy systems, food processing and storage, and small-scale implements used in conservation agriculture.

Student Involvement

In addition to technology demonstrations, the farm hosts interdisciplinary research projects, collegiate experiential classes, and undergraduate volunteers. Through design, implementation, and evaluation, the PFP aims to connect WSU students and faculty with global smallholding farmers, helping local communities increase productivity, improve nutrition, raise net incomes, and reduce hunger and poverty.

Photos From the Paluthe Farm Project

Featured Interventions:

Latrines & Latrine Caps
Mud Stove Kits
Treadle Pump
Small-Scale Threshers & Seed Cleaners

20141219_152039

Through design, implementation, and evaluation, the Paluthe Farm Project demonstrates technologies used worldwide by smallholding farmers, helping local communities increase productivity, improve nutrition, raise net incomes, and reduce hunger and poverty.

Project Coordinators:

Levi McGarry

levi.mcgarry@wsu.edu

Meg Pannkuk

meg.pannkuk@wsu.edu

Featured Interventions:

Latrines & Latrine Caps
Mud Stove Kits
Treadle Pump
Small-Scale Threshers & Seed Cleaners

20141219_152039

Through design, implementation, and evaluation, the Paluthe Farm Project demonstrates technologies used worldwide by smallholding farmers, helping local communities increase productivity, improve nutrition, raise net incomes, and reduce hunger and poverty.

Project Coordinators:

Levi McGarry

levi.mcgarry@wsu.edu

Meg Pannkuk

meg.pannkuk@wsu.edu

International Research & Agricultural Development, PO Box 646243, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164-6243, 509-335-2985, Contact Us
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